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Mark Rothko: Toward the Light in the Chapel

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Mark Rothko: Toward the Light in the Chapel

Rothko.jpg
Rothko.jpg

Mark Rothko: Toward the Light in the Chapel

25.00

By Annie Cohen-Solal
Published March 10, 2015
296 pages

“Illuminating. Sublime.” —The Washington Times

A fascinating exploration of the life and work of one of America’s most famous and enigmatic postwar visual artists

Mark Rothko, one of the greatest painters of the twentieth century, was born in the Jewish Pale of Settlement in 1903. He immigrated to the United States at age ten, taking with him his Talmudic education and his memories of pogroms and persecutions in Russia. His integration into American society began with a series of painful experiences, especially as a student at Yale, where he felt marginalized for his origins and ultimately left the school. The decision to become an artist led him to a new phase in his life. Early in his career, Annie Cohen-Solal writes, “he became a major player in the social struggle of American artists, and his own metamorphosis benefited from the unique transformation of the U.S. art world during this time.” Within a few decades, he had forged his definitive artistic signature, and most critics hailed him as a pioneer. The numerous museum shows that followed in major U.S. and European institutions ensured his celebrity. But this was not enough for Rothko, who continued to innovate. Ever faithful to his habit of confronting the establishment, he devoted the last decade of his life to cultivating his new conception of art as an experience, thanks to the commission of a radical project, the Rothko Chapel in Houston, Texas.

Cohen-Solal’s fascinating biography, based on considerable archival research, tells the unlikely story of how a young immigrant from Dvinsk became a crucial transforming agent of the art world—one whose legacy prevails to this day.

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About the Author

Annie Cohen-Solal’s books include Sartre: A Life (a best-seller translated into sixteen languages), Painting American (Académie des Beaux arts Prize), and Leo & His Circle: The Life of Leo Castelli (ArtCurial Prize).



Reviews

“Cohen-Solal subtly demonstrates the link between Rothko’s three outsider statuses (artist, immigrant, and Jew), his color-block canvases, and his essential Americanness.” —The New Yorker

“Written in succinct and fast-paced prose, this streamlined volume…argues that Rothko’s Jewishness is at the core of his life and art.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Cohen-Solal has made an important contribution with a well-researched book about Rothko’s life.” —New Criterion

“This novelistic account is a rewarding close-up of Rothko’s personal life and his experience as a Jewish immigrant.” —Publisher's Weekly